Taking It Slow – Why not going all out may lead to better results

It can be very hard to hold yourself back when you feel like you could do more….when you have done more before.

But just because you CAN do something, just because you’ve even done it in the past, doesn’t mean your body is ready to handle it right now.

For instance, I was gym-less for about a month and, on top of that, I’d been focusing on breathing squats and upping my weights with that. I hadn’t done any type of deadlift but supplemental single leg deadlifts for numerous months.

While I’d been working on leg and glute strength, I hadn’t done any conventional deadlifts for a very long time.

So yesterday when I decided to do conventional barbell deadlifts for the first time in many months, I knew I had to take my time and start with less weight than I wanted.

Even when the weight felt easy, I knew I had to take things slowly.

Because while my muscles may have been strong enough and I had even lifted double the weight I was using for double the reps, it really won’t benefit me to just drastic increase the weight after not having done much weight or even that specific movement for a few months.

My body needed time to readjust to the movement. (Plus what would be the point of making myself so sore I threw off my other workouts that week and then couldn’t go harder the next week?!?)

And I considered all of this and chose to use lighter weight even though I’d been doing heavy lifts so my connective tissue was prepared to handle heavy loads.

I took it slow. Because there is no point to push too far too fast.

So just imagine if you hadn’t ever lifted before and you jumped straight into heavy weight.

While your muscles may be able to lift the weight, your body, your connective tissues, may not be ready to handle the load.

And pushing too far too fast will only lead to injury.

So why not take it slow and be able to build up with no setbacks!?!

Is being able to think you are gnarly cause you lifted a ton on your first attempt really worth it?

Or is it more worth it to remain injury free and end up being able to lift even heavier weights in the long run?

I think lifting more weight in the long run and remaining injury free is worth the wait. I think it is worth taking things slowly and not giving into pride.

But maybe that is just me…..

Next time you feel the urge to do more, think about why you really want to do more.

Is it because of pride? Is it because you don’t feel tired enough right then and there and have to “feel” like you did enough?

Is it because you are more focused on being sore than on progression?

Because the thing is…Small incremental changes over time will lead to bigger and better LASTING RESULTS.

Do you find you struggle with being patient and taking things slow?

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Posted on July 8, 2014, in Conventional Wisdom - How I hate you, Mindset and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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